American History

New! American History for High School
American History Odyssey (level 3)

Too often high school American history is mind-numbingly dull; or it is heavily slanted politically, religiously, and/or culturally. American History Odyssey is unlike any other. It is an academically rigorous, in-depth course that aims to encourage students to interact with history holistically and critically. Students are introduced to both the commendable and the disappointing in America’s history, aiming to teach them how to think about the past, rather than what to think.

American History Odyssey examines important turning points in our history from Native Americans before European contact to the Great Depression to the Civil Rights Movement to the impact of technology and the arts on America, and so much more.

Through the author’s original sweeping narratives and online textbook readings, students learn the foundation of American history. Then they apply what they have learned with analysis of a multitude of primary sources, the reading of important literature, essay writing, presentations, geography mapping, tests, and projects.

Unlike typical American history courses, American History Odyssey gives students the access and the tools to practice historical and analytical skills in the most interesting, engaging, and interactive way.

American History Odyssey (level 3) curriculum consists of two books:

American History Odyssey (3) Student Guide includes:
  • 167 Detailed lessons written for independent use:
  • 17 Original history Overviews
  • Writing assignments
  • Literature assignments
  • Map work
  • Projects
  • Spotlight research assignments
  • 17 Maps for United States geography
  • Primary resources
  • Literature excerpts
Book and Supply List for AHO (3)
Main Reference Spines:
  • Digital History (digitalhistory.uh.edu) by Stephen Mintz and Sara McNeil (a free online textbook)
  • History Overview essays by Lisa Hawkins (included in guide)
Literature and Video:
  • The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin
  • Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass by Frederick Douglass
  • The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
  • The Civil War – a film by Ken Burns
  • The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
  • A Raisin in the Sun – a play written by Lorraine Hansberry
Other Supplies:
  • Internet access
  • Computer and printer access
  • 3-ring notebook (2 size is recommended)
  • 9 tabbed dividers
  • Hole-punch
  • Colored pencils
  • Basic craft supplies
  • Timeline (optional)
American History Odyssey (3) Teacher Guide includes:
  • Assistance for the 167 lessons found in the Student Guide
  • Scheduling and planning for each of the nine units
  • Learning goals and objectives
  • Nine unit exams and exam answer keys
  • Essay and research paper writing assistance
  • Rubrics to assist with grading student assignments
  • Seventeen map keys for United States geography
 
 
About the Author of American History Odyssey (3)

Lisa Hawkins was born and raised in New York, although she also lived for some time in Miami, Puerto Rico, and on a commune in San Diego. She went to Swarthmore College in the Philadelphia area, where she thought she was going to be a research biology major. After almost setting fire to her chemistry lab and mistaking a fake plastic owl for a real one, Lisa realized that a career in lab science was not for her, and probably dangerous for everyone else. Grudgingly, she took a history course her junior year and was immediately hooked for life. She went on to Temple University to earn her Masters in History and Widener University to do graduate work in Education and Literature. In 1993, she married her college sweetheart, and together they have four children, who have been homeschooled.

Lisa has been an adjunct college professor since 1998, creating courses and teaching in history departments for several institutions both live and online. In 2012, she received an Outstanding Adjunct Faculty award from one of her universities. Lisa had also been a high school literature and history teacher at an inner-city, classically based academy. When she’s not teaching or reading nerdy history books, she will be watching international soccer games, listening to Van Morrison, or enjoying a good movie. Well, her husband questions whether all the movies she enjoys are good, since she continues to find Napoleon Dynamite funny after several viewings, but that’s another story.

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